Research

My research interests are surveillance, policing, and criminological theory. I have contributed to various research studies which address the relationship between surveillance and policing, as well as related topics including crime control through CCTV cameras, police accountability and wearable cameras, and citizen journalism. My most recent research experiences include the ESRC-funded Human Rights, Big Data, and Technology project (HRBDT) and the SSHRC-funded Police on Camera Project (POC), which was undertaken as part of my doctorate, and

Research Experience

The Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Project (HRBDT) I 2016 – Current

As senior research officer, I conduct qualitative research examining how various police and security agencies use big data and associated technologies for surveillance. Current research has been split into two ethnographic research project.

In the first project, I examine how police officers employ predictive policing algorithms to foresee crime and if/how human rights such as equality and privacy are accounted for. In the second,

In the second, I examine how members of various racial, ethnic, and religious communities are affected by perceived and actual government surveillance in the UK. Research is conducted in collaboration with researchers at Amnesty International who examine the so called “chilling effect” of mass surveillance.

The Policing on Camera Case Study 2013-2014

As lead researcher, I employed a case study methodology and relied on participant observation and interview data gathering strategies. Research included: 200+ hours of in-field research with 3 policing organisations, 60+ informal interviews with police officers and members of police organisations, and 20+ formal semi-structured interviews.

Most recent publications

‘I’m Glad That Was On Camera’ by A Sandhu in Policing and Society 2017

This article presents the central findings of the Police on Camera project and offers details into the strategic orientation many research participants expressed when asked about policing on camera.

Camera-Friendly Policing by A Sandhu in Surveillance & Society 2016

This article argues that instead of engaging in counter-surveillance, police officers allow themselves to be recorded and engage in what I call “camera-friendly policing,” which involves efforts to control how they are perceived while video recorded.

Policing on Camera by A Sandhu and K Haggerty in Theoretical Criminology 2015

This article outlines the findings of one of the first studies examining how police understand and respond to cameras and photographers.

Other Publications

High-Visibility Policing by A Sandhu and K Haggerty in Oxford Handbooks Online 2015

This article analyses the situation surrounding police visibility and questions the extent to which videos of the police are producing uniformly negative outcomes for them

Private Eyes by A Sandhu and K Haggerty in Handbook of Private Security Studies 2015

This article analyses the extent to which videos of the police are producing uniformly negative outcomes for them. As co-authors, Kevin Haggerty and I shared all duties.

The Police’s Crisis of Visibility by K Haggerty and A Sandhu in IEEE Technology & Society 2014

This article discusses the increasingly fraught relationship police

 

Author: theajayblog

I hold a doctorate degree in sociology and specialise in qualitative criminological research. My research interests include surveillance and policing. My most recent research project is entitled The Police on Camera and examines the intersection of surveillance and legal authority, with a twist. Rather than exploring police officers’ use of surveillance cameras to monitor criminal behaviour, I research the use of cameras to monitor police, and the experiences of police officers in the “surveillance society.” My research has led to many publications which offer insights into the politics of the police’s growing visibility.

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